Warner Propeller & Governor Co. 

Proudly serving the aviation community since 1965

FAA CRS# W59R659R

Services
New and used Sales
Propeller & Governor Overhaul
Propeller & Governor Repair
Propeller & Governor Exchanges
Experimental Solutions
Public Speaking 
Pick-Up & Delivery
NDT Services
Worldwide Shipping

NDT Services
Magnetic Particle Inspection
Dye Penetrate Inspection
Eddy Current Inspection
 

 

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Call us today for pricing and quote information:
PHONE 520.294.5671

PHONE: 520.294.5671

Magnetic Particle Inspection

This inspection is preformed on clean steel parts. The part is placed within a magnetic coil and magnetized. It is then coated with a magnetic florescent liquid. In a darkened area a black light is used to insect the part. If the part has a crack or defect, the area will become polarized from the magnetization. The magnetic florescent liquid will be attracted to the area and will fluoresce or glow bright green in the black light. After inspection, the part is demagnetized. 


Dye Penetrant Inspection

This inspection is preformed on clean aluminum parts. The part is coated with a special florescent penetrant and is set aside to allow the penetrant to absorb into any cracks or defects. The part is then rinsed and dried. A chalky powder is sprayed onto the part to draw out the penetrant from any cracks or defects. In a darkened area a black light is used to inspect the part. If the part has a crack or defect, the drawn out penetrant will fluoresce or glow bright green in the black light.


Eddy Current Inspection

At our facility, this inspection is preformed on clean aluminum parts. This method uses electric current to detect changes in the properties of conductive materials. These changes are represented as a graph on the Eddy Current machine. 

A probe, containing a very small tightly wound coil is placed in contact with the part to be inspected. Alternating current is applied to the coil which causes a magnetic field to be created around the coil. Similar to the principals of a transformer, the area of the part closest to the probe, in turn, produces its own magnetic field which counteracts the probes magnetic field. The opposition between these two magnetic fields can be monitored for any change. Since the current applied to the probe remains constant, any change is attributed to the part being inspected. 

This allows the Eddy Current method to detect changes in alloy, geometry, hardness, as well as detecting flaws in the material such as corrosion, fatigue cracks, laps, seams, and porosity.